Experience East Jutland

Top 10 Activities

  1. Seal watching and hiking on the island of Samsø
  2. Taking a kid-friendly bike ride on the nature path between Horsens and Silkeborg
  3. Trout fishing at Vejle Fjord
  4. Hiking on Hærvejen, the ‘Army Road’, at Gudenåen
  5. Canoeing on the Gudenå from Tørring to Silkeborg
  6. Mountain biking as part of a tour in Søndre Plantage near Ebeltoft
  7. Kayaking at Mols Bjerge National Park
  8. Enjoying the kid-friendly sandy beaches at Grenaa and Fjellerup in Northern Djursland
  9. Fishing in the beautiful Sangstrup Klint setting
  10. Take a nature walk and picnic at the ruins of Kalø Castle
East Jutland is not only home to Denmark's dynamic second city of Aarhus, it also offers you a wonderful combination of fertile landscape, expansive forests, sandy shorelines and bustling cities. 
 
The green and hilly landscape of the region was formed by the glaciers of the last glaciation. Valleys, gorges and deep fjords were all carved by the flow of glacial melt water and when the ice finally disappeared around 14,000 years ago, it left a beautiful, hilly moraine landscape. You’ll find that East Jutland is easily accessible and full of varied, outdoor experiences

In the East, Djursland, also known as the ‘nose’ of Denmark, juts out into the Kattegat Sea. While the northern part of this area is mostly chalk, the southern part contains troves of bays and coves. The diverse landscape houses some of the country’s largest stone dolmens, interesting churches with breath-taking frescoes, beautiful mansions, and quaint towns. The old market town of Ebeltoft is a unique mixture of idyllic cobblestone streets, harbour life, and picturesque beaches.

In terms of scenery, Søhøjlandet surrounding Silkeborg, has the country’s biggest number of lakes, as well being home to Denmark’s highest point called Ejer Bjerge. Don’t miss a trip on the Hjejlen steamboat along the Gudenå river, or a hike up Himmelbjerget, one of Denmark’s highest peaks. At Aqua Akvarium & Dyrepark you can encounter playful otters and raccoons, and of course, the kids will love the park’s unique water playground!

If you’re looking for hands-on activities where you can learn about water and energy, then make sure you visit the Energy Museum on Tange Sø near Bjerringbro or perhaps you’d like a whirlwind journey to the rainforests? Then do check out Randers Regnskov. For an exciting trip into the past Moesgaard Museum in Aarhus is the place for you. The baroque period can be experienced at Clausholm Slot, while at Gammel Estrup you can visit the ”deadly, green, tower room”.

The broad-mouthed Horsens and Vejle Fjords cut into the countryside creating harmonious and eye-catching scenery. The coastal forests near Vejle in particular offer peaceful walking trails. Eastern Jutland’s coast is dotted with small islands including Endelave and Tunø and the larger island of Samsø.

Further inland, the Skjernå and the Gudenå originate from the same valley but run out to Kattegat and the North Sea respectively. Taking a canoe from Tørring, you can flow along the current to Silkeborg or further past Tangeværket or Randers. There’s also an opportunity to hike along the old barge transport path from Silkeborg to Randers.

In Eastern Jutland, you can still see the remains of the old Hærvej (Army Road), starting in Viborg and going south from there. Originally it was used to transport cattle, but these days cyclists and hikers mostly use the trail. In the Viking Age, the king resided in Jelling, consequently ensuring that today there is an abundance of cultural heritage here. Fredericia on the other hand, is a prime example of a Danish fortress town. Even during the Viking Age, Aarhus was an important town, while the town of Skanderborg grew large because of its royal castle. Silkeborg only became a certified market town in the middle of the 19th century when a paper factory was established.